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Microsoft Modern Desktop Administrator: Windows 10 (MD-100) PRO*

40 Videos
6 Hours
74 Test Questions

Closed Caption

Certificate

Dedicated Tutors

Microsoft Modern Desktop Administrator: Windows 10 (MD-100) PRO*

Course Highlights

Closed Caption

Certificate

Dedicated Tutors

6 Hours
40 Videos

Microsoft Modern Desktop Administrator: Windows 10 (MD-100) PRO*

Course Description

6 Hours

40 Videos

Microsoft’s outlines for Windows 10 certification as a “Modern Desktop Administrator Associate” cover two learning paths: the MD-100 path, titled Windows 10, and the MD-101 path, titled Managing Modern Desktops. These outlines have different emphases, but some topics overlap. This mini-course presents a guide to both tracks and synopses of the courses. It also explains the areas of overlap and where the two learning paths differ in terms both of content and emphasis. We conclude with study recommendations for both IT administrators and exam candidates.

In this course, students will learn how to support and configure Windows 10 desktops in an organizational environment. Students will develop skills that include learning how to install, customize, and update Windows 10 operating systems. Students will learn how to managing storage, files, and devices as well as how to configure network connectivity for Windows 10. Students will also learn how to secure the Windows 10 OS and protect the data on the device. Finally, students will learn how to manage and troubleshoot Windows 10.

The new Microsoft Desktop Administrator Associate certification validates a candidate’s ability to deploy and secure Windows 10, configure connectivity, and manage and protect devices. This course covers the key concepts of Windows 10 implementation for IT professionals who hope to pass exam MD-100: Windows 10, one of two required exams for this certification. Learn how to choose between an upgrade and a clean install, create installation media, migrate to Windows 10, and configure and manage device drivers. Instructor helps you configure key settings and applications your clients will need, including the Start menu preferences, notifications, Cortana, and Hyper-V. She also explores enterprise-level solutions such as Active Directory-based activation of Windows.

Course Syllabus

Learning objectives

      • Deploying Windows 10
      • Performing post-installation configuration
      • Managing local users, groups, and devices
      • Configuring data access and protection
      • Configuring devices using local policies
      • Managing Windows security
      • Configuring networking
      • Configuring remote connectivity
      • Configuring system and data recovery
      • Managing updates
      • Monitoring and managing Windows

COURSE OUTLINE

1 – INSTALLING WINDOWS
  • Introducing Windows 10
  • Windows 10 Editions and Requirements
  • Deployment Options
  • Upgrading to Windows 10
  • Deployment Tools
2 – POST-INSTALLATION CONFIGURATION AND PERSONALIZATION
  • Configure and Customize the Windows Start Menu
  • Common Configuration Options
  • Advanced Configuration Methods
  • Managing Drivers and Devices
3 – UPDATING WINDOWS IN WINDOWS 10
  • Windows Servicing Model
  • Updating Windows
4 – CONFIGURING NETWORKING
  • Configure IP Network Connectivity
  • Implement Name Resolution
  • Implement Wireless Network Connectivity
  • Remote Access Overview
  • Remote Management
5 – CONFIGURING STORAGE
  • Overview of storage options
  • Managing Local Storage
  • Maintaining Disks and Volumes
  • Managing Storage Spaces
6 – MANAGING APPS IN WINDOWS 10
  • Providing Apps to Users
  • Managing Universal Windows Apps
  • Web Browsers in Windows 10
7 – CONFIGURING AUTHORIZATION & AUTHENTICATION
  • Authentication
  • Configuring User Account Control
  • Implementing Device Registration
8 – CONFIGURING DATA ACCESS AND USAGE
  • Overview of File Systems
  • Configuring and Managing File Access
  • Configuring and Managing Shared Folders
9 – CONFIGURING THREAT PROTECTION AND ADVANCED SECURITY
  • Malware and Threat Protection
  • Windows Defender
  • Connection Security Rules
  • Advanced Protection Methods
10 – SUPPORTING THE WINDOWS 10 ENVIRONMENT
  • Windows Architecture
  • Support and Diagnostic Tools
  • Monitoring and Troubleshooting Computer Performance
11 – TROUBLESHOOTING FILES & APPLICATIONS
  • File Recovery in Windows 10
  • Application Troubleshooting
12 – TROUBLESHOOTING THE OS
  • Troubleshooting Windows Startup
  • Troubleshooting Operating System Service Issues
13 – TROUBLESHOOTING HARDWARE AND DRIVERS
  • Troubleshooting Device Driver Failures
  • Overview of Hardware Troubleshooting
  • Troubleshooting Physical Failures

Actual course outline may vary depending on offering center. Contact your sales representative for more information.

Topics Include:

001-Setting up Windows
002-Hardware feature and compatibility requirements
003-Choose an upgrade or clean installation
004-Choose a Windows 10 edition
005-Create installation media
006-Perform a clean installation
007-Upgrade with Windows Update
008-Upgrade with installation media
009-Perform an in place upgrade
010-Troubleshoot activation issues
011-Install to a VHD-git. ir
012-Configure a native boot scenario
013-Migrate from a previous version
014-Create a bootable USB drive
015-Install additional features and languages
016-Configure mobility
017-Configure sign in options. mp4
018-Configure regional and language support
019-Configure local Registry
020-Implement local policy
021-Troubleshoot group policies on devices
022-Configure device drivers
023-Configure driver settings
024-Download and import driver packages
025-Manage driver packages
026-Configure the Start menu and desktop
027-Configure notification settings
028-Explore accessibility options
029-Configure Cortana. mp4
030-Configure Microsoft Edge
031-Configure Internet Explorer
032-Configure Hyper V
033-Power options
034-Provision Windows with the ICD tool
035-Active Directory based activation

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Frequently Asked Questions

Instructional methods, course requirements, and learning technologies can vary significantly from one online program to the next, but the vast bulk of them use a learning management system (LMS) to deliver lectures and materials, monitor student progress, assess comprehension, and accept student work. LMS providers design these platforms to accommodate a multitude of instructor needs and preferences.

Online education may seem relatively new, but years of research suggests it can be just as effective as traditional coursework, and often more so. According to a U.S. Department of Education analysis of more than 1,000 learning studies, online students tend to outperform classroom-based students across most disciplines and demographics. Another major review published the same year found that online students had the advantage 70 percent of the time, a gap authors projected would only widen as programs and technologies evolve.

All new learning innovations are met with some degree of scrutiny, but skepticism subsides as methods become more mainstream. Such is the case for online learning. Studies indicate employers who are familiar with online degrees tend to view them more favorably, and more employers are acquainted with them than ever before. The majority of colleges now offer online degrees, including most public, not-for-profit, and Ivy League universities. Online learning is also increasingly prevalent in the workplace as more companies invest in web-based employee training and development programs.

The concern that online students cheat more than traditional students is perhaps misplaced. When researchers at Marshall University conducted a study to measure the prevalence of cheating in online and classroom-based courses, they concluded, “Somewhat surprisingly, the results showed higher rates of academic dishonesty in live courses.” The authors suggest the social familiarity of students in a classroom setting may lessen their sense of moral obligation.

Choosing the right course takes time and careful research no matter how one intends to study. Learning styles, goals, and programs always vary, but students considering online courses must consider technical skills, ability to self-motivate, and other factors specific to the medium. Online course demos and trials can also be helpful.
Our platform is typically designed to be as user-friendly as possible: intuitive controls, clear instructions, and tutorials guide students through new tasks. However, students still need basic computer skills to access and navigate these programs. These skills include: using a keyboard and a mouse; running computer programs; using the Internet; sending and receiving email; using word processing programs; and using forums and other collaborative tools. Most online programs publish such requirements on their websites. If not, an admissions adviser can help.

Frequently Asked Questions

Instructional methods, course requirements, and learning technologies can vary significantly from one online program to the next, but the vast bulk of them use a learning management system (LMS) to deliver lectures and materials, monitor student progress, assess comprehension, and accept student work. LMS providers design these platforms to accommodate a multitude of instructor needs and preferences.

Online education may seem relatively new, but years of research suggests it can be just as effective as traditional coursework, and often more so. According to a U.S. Department of Education analysis of more than 1,000 learning studies, online students tend to outperform classroom-based students across most disciplines and demographics. Another major review published the same year found that online students had the advantage 70 percent of the time, a gap authors projected would only widen as programs and technologies evolve.

All new learning innovations are met with some degree of scrutiny, but skepticism subsides as methods become more mainstream. Such is the case for online learning. Studies indicate employers who are familiar with online degrees tend to view them more favorably, and more employers are acquainted with them than ever before. The majority of colleges now offer online degrees, including most public, not-for-profit, and Ivy League universities. Online learning is also increasingly prevalent in the workplace as more companies invest in web-based employee training and development programs.

The concern that online students cheat more than traditional students is perhaps misplaced. When researchers at Marshall University conducted a study to measure the prevalence of cheating in online and classroom-based courses, they concluded, “Somewhat surprisingly, the results showed higher rates of academic dishonesty in live courses.” The authors suggest the social familiarity of students in a classroom setting may lessen their sense of moral obligation.

Choosing the right course takes time and careful research no matter how one intends to study. Learning styles, goals, and programs always vary, but students considering online courses must consider technical skills, ability to self-motivate, and other factors specific to the medium. Online course demos and trials can also be helpful.
Our platform is typically designed to be as user-friendly as possible: intuitive controls, clear instructions, and tutorials guide students through new tasks. However, students still need basic computer skills to access and navigate these programs. These skills include: using a keyboard and a mouse; running computer programs; using the Internet; sending and receiving email; using word processing programs; and using forums and other collaborative tools. Most online programs publish such requirements on their websites. If not, an admissions adviser can help.

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Description

Microsoft’s outlines for Windows 10 certification as a “Modern Desktop Administrator Associate” cover two learning paths: the MD-100 path, titled Windows 10, and the MD-101 path, titled Managing Modern Desktops. These outlines have different emphases, but some topics overlap. This mini-course presents a guide to both tracks and synopses of the courses. It also explains the areas of overlap and where the two learning paths differ in terms both of content and emphasis. We conclude with study recommendations for both IT administrators and exam candidates.

In this course, students will learn how to support and configure Windows 10 desktops in an organizational environment. Students will develop skills that include learning how to install, customize, and update Windows 10 operating systems. Students will learn how to managing storage, files, and devices as well as how to configure network connectivity for Windows 10. Students will also learn how to secure the Windows 10 OS and protect the data on the device. Finally, students will learn how to manage and troubleshoot Windows 10.

The new Microsoft Desktop Administrator Associate certification validates a candidate’s ability to deploy and secure Windows 10, configure connectivity, and manage and protect devices. This course covers the key concepts of Windows 10 implementation for IT professionals who hope to pass exam MD-100: Windows 10, one of two required exams for this certification. Learn how to choose between an upgrade and a clean install, create installation media, migrate to Windows 10, and configure and manage device drivers. Instructor helps you configure key settings and applications your clients will need, including the Start menu preferences, notifications, Cortana, and Hyper-V. She also explores enterprise-level solutions such as Active Directory-based activation of Windows.

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