New members: Get your first 7 days of ITTutorPro Premium for free! Join for free

Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA)

Course Description

12.48 Hours

74 Videos

Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA)

CISA is to Audit what CPA and CA are to Accounting. Internationally, professionals recognize CISAs as possessing the knowledge, skills, experience, and credibility to leverage standards, manage vulnerabilities, ensure compliance, offer solutions, institute controls, and deliver value to the enterprise. ISACA has completed the job practice analysis for CISA.

This analysis resulted in a new CISA job practice that reflects the vital and evolving responsibilities of IT auditors. The new CISA job practice was effective beginning with the CISA exam administration in June 2011. In these statements, we consider the terms ‘enterprise’ and ‘organization’ or ‘organizational’ as synonymous.

Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA): Navigating the Path to IT Assurance

In the rapidly evolving world of information technology, organizations rely on robust systems and secure data handling. To ensure the integrity, confidentiality, and availability of information systems, they turn to Certified Information Systems Auditors (CISAs) – professionals adept at safeguarding critical data and mitigating risks.

Understanding the CISA Certification:

ISACA, a leading professional association in the field of information technology, confers the CISA certification, which globally recognizes it as a mark of excellence in IT assurance, security, and governance.

Key Areas of Expertise:

CISAs are experts in several key domains:

  • Information Systems Auditing: They are proficient in evaluating an organization’s information systems, practices, and controls to ensure they meet regulatory requirements and best practices.
  • Governance and Management: CISAs assess an organization’s governance framework, examining management and operational controls, risk management, and strategic planning.
  • Information Systems Acquisition and Development: They ensure that information systems are designed and developed with security and compliance in mind, reducing vulnerabilities.
  • Information Systems Operations and Business Resilience: CISAs review the ongoing operations of IT systems, including incident management and disaster recovery, to ensure they are resilient to disruptions.
  • Protection of Information Assets: Safeguarding an organization’s sensitive information is paramount. CISAs assess security policies, access controls, and data protection measures.

Why CISA Matters:

  • Global Recognition: CISA is internationally respected and sought after by organizations across various industries. Holding this certification demonstrates a commitment to excellence in IT audit, control, and assurance.
  • Career Advancement: CISA certification can open doors to career advancement opportunities, such as IT auditing, risk management, and compliance roles.
  • Risk Mitigation: In an era of increasing cyber threats, CISAs help organizations identify and mitigate risks to their information systems, protecting sensitive data from breaches.
  • Compliance: CISAs ensure organizations meet regulatory requirements, helping them avoid legal issues and financial penalties.
  • Continuous Learning: To maintain their CISA certification, professionals must engage in ongoing professional education, ensuring they stay current in a rapidly evolving field.

Becoming a CISA:

To earn the CISA certification, candidates must pass the CISA exam, meet the work experience requirements, and adhere to the ISACA Code of Professional Ethics and Continuing Professional Education (CPE) policy.

In conclusion, Certified Information Systems Auditors (CISAs) are instrumental in securing and assuring the reliability of information systems for organizations worldwide. Their expertise in auditing, governance, and risk management makes them invaluable guardians of critical data in the digital age.

Course Highlights

Closed Caption

Certificate

Dedicated Tutors

Share on:

Proudly Display Your Achievement

Upon completion of your training, you’ll receive a personalized certificate of completion to help validate to others your new skills.

Course Syllabus

Lesson 1

  1. Introduction
  2. Audit Process
  3. Auditing Standards
  4. Auditing Guidelines
  5. Cobit Model
  6. Audit Management
  7. Internal Control Classifications
  8. Planning
  9. Program
  10. Evidence
  11. Audit Control Evaluation
  12. CSA Control Self-Assessment

Lesson 2

  1. IT Governance
  2. Governance & Security Policies
  3. Outsourcing & Governance
  4. Outsourcing & Globalization
  5. Organizational Compliance
  6. IT Strategy
  7. IT Performance

Lesson 3

  1. System & Infrastructure
  2. Requirements
  3. Project Management Tools – Part 1
  4. Project Management Tools – Part 2
  5. Applications
  6. Agile Development
  7. Monitoring & Controlling
  8. Acquisition Process
  9. Testing Process
  10. Information Systems Maintenance Practices
  11. Data Conversion Tools

Lesson 4

  1. Media Disposal Process
  2. Post Implementation Review
  3. Periodic Review
  4. System Maintenance

Lesson 5

  1. IT Service Delivery and Support
  2. How to Evalutate Service Level Management Practices
  3. Operations Management
  4. Databases
  5. Structured Query Language (SQL)
  6. Monitoring Performance
  7. Source Code and Perfomance Monitoring
  8. Patch Management
  9. Incident Management
  10. Hardware Component Types
  11. Network Component Types

Lesson 6

  1. IS Auditor Technical Overview
  2. Security Design
  3. Monitoring Systems
  4. Types of Attacks
  5. Cryptography
  6. Encryption
  7. Asymmetric Encryption
  8. Digital Certificate
  9. Different Kinds of Attacks
  10. Access Controls
  11. Identification and Authenication
  12. Physical Access Exposure
  13. Environmental Security
  14. Network Security Devices and Network Components
  15. Network Address Translation
  16. Virtual Private Networks (VPNs)
  17. Voice System Risks
  18. Intrusion Detection
  19. Firewalls
  20. Firewall Implementation
  21. Network Access Protection
  22. HoneyPot
  23. Risks to Portable and Wireless Devices
  24. Bluetooth
  25. OSI Networking
  26. Managing Data

Lesson 7

  1. Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery
  2. Fault Tolerance
  3. Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery Regulations

CISA is a globally recognized certification meticulously designed for the professionals responsible for monitoring, managing, and protecting an organization’s IT and business environment. The CISA certification training course validates the certification holder’s skills and expertise to assess vulnerabilities, report compliance issues, and successfully implement IT security controls for an organization.CISA is a globally recognized certification meticulously designed for the professionals responsible for monitoring, managing, and protecting an organization’s IT and business environment. The CISA certification training course validates the certification holder’s skills and expertise to assess vulnerabilities, report compliance issues, and successfully implement IT security controls for an organization.

From: $14.99 / month

Clear
it-2-logo.png

You Will Get Certification After Completetion This Course.

From: $14.99 / month

Clear

Frequently Asked Questions

Instructional methods, course requirements, and learning technologies can vary significantly from one online program to the next, but the vast bulk of them use a learning management system (LMS) to deliver lectures and materials, monitor student progress, assess comprehension, and accept student work. LMS providers design these platforms to accommodate a multitude of instructor needs and preferences.

Online education may seem relatively new, but years of research suggests it can be just as effective as traditional coursework, and often more so. According to a U.S. Department of Education analysis of more than 1,000 learning studies, online students tend to outperform classroom-based students across most disciplines and demographics. Another major review published the same year found that online students had the advantage 70 percent of the time, a gap authors projected would only widen as programs and technologies evolve.

All new learning innovations are met with some degree of scrutiny, but skepticism subsides as methods become more mainstream. Such is the case for online learning. Studies indicate employers who are familiar with online degrees tend to view them more favorably, and more employers are acquainted with them than ever before. The majority of colleges now offer online degrees, including most public, not-for-profit, and Ivy League universities. Online learning is also increasingly prevalent in the workplace as more companies invest in web-based employee training and development programs.

The concern that online students cheat more than traditional students is perhaps misplaced. When researchers at Marshall University conducted a study to measure the prevalence of cheating in online and classroom-based courses, they concluded, “Somewhat surprisingly, the results showed higher rates of academic dishonesty in live courses.” The authors suggest the social familiarity of students in a classroom setting may lessen their sense of moral obligation.

Choosing the right course takes time and careful research no matter how one intends to study. Learning styles, goals, and programs always vary, but students considering online courses must consider technical skills, ability to self-motivate, and other factors specific to the medium. Online course demos and trials can also be helpful.
Our platform is typically designed to be as user-friendly as possible: intuitive controls, clear instructions, and tutorials guide students through new tasks. However, students still need basic computer skills to access and navigate these programs. These skills include: using a keyboard and a mouse; running computer programs; using the Internet; sending and receiving email; using word processing programs; and using forums and other collaborative tools. Most online programs publish such requirements on their websites. If not, an admissions adviser can help.

Description

Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA)

CISA is to Audit what CPA and CA are to Accounting. Internationally, professionals recognize CISAs as possessing the knowledge, skills, experience, and credibility to leverage standards, manage vulnerabilities, ensure compliance, offer solutions, institute controls, and deliver value to the enterprise. ISACA has completed the job practice analysis for CISA.

This analysis resulted in a new CISA job practice that reflects the vital and evolving responsibilities of IT auditors. The new CISA job practice was effective beginning with the CISA exam administration in June 2011. In these statements, we consider the terms ‘enterprise’ and ‘organization’ or ‘organizational’ as synonymous.

Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA): Navigating the Path to IT Assurance

In the rapidly evolving world of information technology, organizations rely on robust systems and secure data handling. To ensure the integrity, confidentiality, and availability of information systems, they turn to Certified Information Systems Auditors (CISAs) – professionals adept at safeguarding critical data and mitigating risks.

Understanding the CISA Certification:

ISACA, a leading professional association in the field of information technology, confers the CISA certification, which globally recognizes it as a mark of excellence in IT assurance, security, and governance.

Key Areas of Expertise:

CISAs are experts in several key domains:

  • Information Systems Auditing: They are proficient in evaluating an organization’s information systems, practices, and controls to ensure they meet regulatory requirements and best practices.
  • Governance and Management: CISAs assess an organization’s governance framework, examining management and operational controls, risk management, and strategic planning.
  • Information Systems Acquisition and Development: They ensure that information systems are designed and developed with security and compliance in mind, reducing vulnerabilities.
  • Information Systems Operations and Business Resilience: CISAs review the ongoing operations of IT systems, including incident management and disaster recovery, to ensure they are resilient to disruptions.
  • Protection of Information Assets: Safeguarding an organization’s sensitive information is paramount. CISAs assess security policies, access controls, and data protection measures.

Why CISA Matters:

  • Global Recognition: CISA is internationally respected and sought after by organizations across various industries. Holding this certification demonstrates a commitment to excellence in IT audit, control, and assurance.
  • Career Advancement: CISA certification can open doors to career advancement opportunities, such as IT auditing, risk management, and compliance roles.
  • Risk Mitigation: In an era of increasing cyber threats, CISAs help organizations identify and mitigate risks to their information systems, protecting sensitive data from breaches.
  • Compliance: CISAs ensure organizations meet regulatory requirements, helping them avoid legal issues and financial penalties.
  • Continuous Learning: To maintain their CISA certification, professionals must engage in ongoing professional education, ensuring they stay current in a rapidly evolving field.

Becoming a CISA:

To earn the CISA certification, candidates must pass the CISA exam, meet the work experience requirements, and adhere to the ISACA Code of Professional Ethics and Continuing Professional Education (CPE) policy.

In conclusion, Certified Information Systems Auditors (CISAs) are instrumental in securing and assuring the reliability of information systems for organizations worldwide. Their expertise in auditing, governance, and risk management makes them invaluable guardians of critical data in the digital age.

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Be the first to review “Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA)”

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

preloader