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Adobe InDesign

Course Description

7.27 Hours

19 Videos

Adobe InDesign is a layout software that takes images and text and lay them out across pages. InDesign is best used for working with multiple page documents like books, magazines, brochures, portfolios and can even be used to create business cards, letterheads, posters and flyers. Graphic designers and production artists are the primary users of this desktop publishing software. It can also be used in conjunction with other Adobe products primarily Photoshop and Illustrator. In the InDesign course, you will be instructed by a top professional in the design industry that holds the titles of 2D Animator and Adjunct Professor of Animation and Digital Art. You will first be shown how to navigate through the InDesign work area and how to create a new document and import images. You will be introduced to “master pages”, an important tool in creating multi-page projects, then you move onto other tools like creating tables and packaging. This course will be also go through more advanced techniques and design methods as well as types of exports.

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Course Syllabus

Module 1

  1. 1.1 Introduction
  2. 1.2 What is InDesign
  3. 1.3 Creating a New Document
  4. 1.4 Importing Images – Part1
  5. 1.5 Importing Images – Part2
  6. 1.6 Vector vs. Pixels
  7. 1.7 Exploring the InDesign Work Area
  8. 1.8 Master Pages

Module 2

  1. 2.1 Typography – Part1
  2. 2.2 Typography – Part2
  3. 2.3 Creating Tables
  4. 2.4 Packaging
  5. 2.5 Principle of Design
  6. 2.6 Knowing Your Output
  7. 2.7 Advanced Techniques in InDesign
  8. 2.8 Using InDesign for Ineractivity
  9. 2.9 Scripts
  10. 2.10 Exporting
  11. 2.11 Conclusion

Adobe InDesign

Adobe InDesign is the industry-leading layout and page design software for print and digital media. Create beautiful graphic designs with typography from the world’s top foundries and imagery. Quickly share content and feedback in PDF. InDesign has everything you need to create and publish books, digital magazines, eBooks, posters, interactive PDFs and more.

When InDesign debuted in 1999, publishing turned a page. The app moved design forward with its support for OpenType fonts, transparency features and cloud-based collaboration — and millions continue to make amazing things with InDesign.

The first version of InDesign was released on August 31, 1999. The program began development long before this, with a different company known as Aldus that was based in Seattle and created desktop publishing software. Aldus developed some of the first graphics and desktop publishing programs available for personal computers that were running early versions of the Windows and Mac operating systems. These included applications such as Super paint and PageMaker. The first version of PageMaker was released by Aldus July 1985 and it provided a simplified graphical user interface that fit the Macintosh point-and-click user experience. PageMaker became popular for early desktop publishing use as a result. At the company’s height in 1990, PageMaker 4.0 hit the market and was considered advanced for its time, although it was starting to see competition from Quark, Inc., a smaller startup based in Denver who produced the electronic publishing software application QuarkXPress.

In 1994, Adobe purchased Aldus and acquired most of their software apps, with the most notable being PageMaker. In the years prior to the Adobe–Aldus acquisition, PageMaker had been losing significant market share to QuarkXPress. Quark had many more features and eventually pushed PageMaker out of the professional desktop publishing market.

InDesign provides the tools necessary to design pages and create visual layouts that can be used for both print and digital media. InDesign provides users a simplified way to create professional pages which can be published and distributed in print or online.

InDesign is especially useful for documents containing multiple pages, layouts that combine text and images, and those containing significant amounts of text.

InDesign is used for creating print and digital documents including books, flyers, magazines, newspapers and brochures.

InDesign was introduced to the world on the heels of the desktop-publishing revolution when personal computing and print publishing became more accessible to the masses. For the first time, individuals, businesses, and organizations—large and small—could directly design, layout, and publish almost any content effortlessly.

InDesign is a desktop publishing software application for creating flyers, brochures, magazines, newspapers, and books. Projects created using InDesign can be shared in both digital and print formats. InDesign is used by graphic designers, artists, publishers, and marketing professionals. It is developed and produced by Adobe Systems and is available individually, or as part of the Adobe Creative Cloud. InDesign was previously available as part of the Creative Suite.

Adobe describes InDesign as “industry-leading layout and page design software” for both print and digital. But while it’s aimed at graphic design professionals, it’s not too difficult to learn—especially if you have the right training. Adobe InDesign is highly accessible, programmed to work for users on both the Mac and Windows operating systems.

It quickly imports many common image file types. InDesign is optimal when creating projects with multiple pages. Take note of the basic ideas of the software to gauge how you could create beautiful, professional designs. Complex functions improve content and design professionalism. Learn the intricacies of Adobe InDesign to ensure project success and fulfill design campaigns. Examining specific functions of the software is a great start to improve project design.

InDesign is often used in conjunction with the Adobe Digital Publishing Suite to create content suitable for tablet devices, and it supports export to EPUB and SWF formats for the creation of ebooks and other digital publications. It also supports XML, style sheets, and other coding markups, allowing for the export of tagged text content for use in other digital and online formats.

InDesign is the best choice to design and publish multipage documents containing text, vector artwork, and images. Use precise grids and guides to position page elements and create polished layouts.

InDesign is the best choice to design and publish multipage documents containing text, vector artwork, and images. Use precise grids and guides to position page elements and create polished layouts. Take advantage of professional typesetting features to format text consistently across pages, chapters, and publications. You can also publish your document online and share it with a single click.

Use InDesign to create a variety of digital and printed material such as stationery, resumes, pamphlets, annual reports, catalogs, interactive digital publications, EPUBs, books, magazines, and more. View the tutorial See what you can create with InDesign for details.

Adobe InDesign is the industry standard for publication design, used by both students and professionals to create posters, brochures, flyers, newspapers, magazines, books, presentations and more. This post will explain your options and how to begin using InDesign to create professional page layouts with this advanced software.

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Frequently Asked Questions

How does online education work on a day-to-day basis?
Instructional methods, course requirements, and learning technologies can vary significantly from one online program to the next, but the vast bulk of them use a learning management system (LMS) to deliver lectures and materials, monitor student progress, assess comprehension, and accept student work. LMS providers design these platforms to accommodate a multitude of instructor needs and preferences.
Is online education as effective as face-to-face instruction?
Online education may seem relatively new, but years of research suggests it can be just as effective as traditional coursework, and often more so. According to a U.S. Department of Education analysis of more than 1,000 learning studies, online students tend to outperform classroom-based students across most disciplines and demographics. Another major review published the same year found that online students had the advantage 70 percent of the time, a gap authors projected would only widen as programs and technologies evolve.
Do employers accept online degrees?
All new learning innovations are met with some degree of scrutiny, but skepticism subsides as methods become more mainstream. Such is the case for online learning. Studies indicate employers who are familiar with online degrees tend to view them more favorably, and more employers are acquainted with them than ever before. The majority of colleges now offer online degrees, including most public, not-for-profit, and Ivy League universities. Online learning is also increasingly prevalent in the workplace as more companies invest in web-based employee training and development programs.
Is online education more conducive to cheating?
The concern that online students cheat more than traditional students is perhaps misplaced. When researchers at Marshall University conducted a study to measure the prevalence of cheating in online and classroom-based courses, they concluded, “Somewhat surprisingly, the results showed higher rates of academic dishonesty in live courses.” The authors suggest the social familiarity of students in a classroom setting may lessen their sense of moral obligation.
How do I know if online education is right for me?
Choosing the right course takes time and careful research no matter how one intends to study. Learning styles, goals, and programs always vary, but students considering online courses must consider technical skills, ability to self-motivate, and other factors specific to the medium. Online course demos and trials can also be helpful.
What technical skills do online students need?
Our platform typically designed to be as user-friendly as possible: intuitive controls, clear instructions, and tutorials guide students through new tasks. However, students still need basic computer skills to access and navigate these programs. These skills include: using a keyboard and a mouse; running computer programs; using the Internet; sending and receiving email; using word processing programs; and using forums and other collaborative tools. Most online programs publish such requirements on their websites. If not, an admissions adviser can help.
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