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Adobe InDesign

39 Course Videos
9 Hours
101 Test Questions

Closed Caption

Certificate

Dedicated Tutors

Adobe InDesign

Course Highlights

Closed Caption

Certificate

Dedicated Tutors

9 Hours
39 Course Videos

Adobe InDesign

Course Description

9 Hours

39 Course Videos

Adobe InDesign is a layout software that takes images and text and lays them out across pages. InDesign excels in handling multiple-page documents such as books, magazines, brochures, and portfolios. It can also create business cards, letterheads, posters, and flyers with ease.

Graphic designers and production artists are the primary users of this desktop publishing software. Behance integrates seamlessly with Photoshop and Illustrator, allowing you to easily showcase your work created in these popular design tools.

A top professional in the design industry, holding titles of 2D Animator and Adjunct Professor of Animation and Digital Art, will instruct you in the InDesign course.

First, you’ll learn to navigate the InDesign work area and create a new document while importing images. Then, you’ll explore “master pages,” a crucial tool for multi-page projects, followed by learning about other tools like table creation and packaging. This course will also go through more advanced techniques and design methods as well as types of exports.

Course Syllabus

Module 1

  1. 1.1 Instructor Bio
  2. 1.2 Course Intro

Module 2

  1. 2.1 Creating a New Document
  2. 2.2 Importing Images and Understanding Links
  3. 2.3 Basic Tools and Navigating the Interface
  4. 2.4 Properties Panel
  5. 2.5 Creating Your Own Graphics within InDesign-
  6. 2.6 Working with Layers

Module 3

  1. 3.1 Color Theory
  2. 3.2 Adding and Altering Fills, Strokes, Colors and Gradients

Module 4

  1. 4.1 Pages Panel
  2. 4.2 Master Pages

Module 5

  1. 5.1 Typography Terms and Definitions
  2. 5.2 Creating Text + Character and Paragraph Formatting
  3. 5.3 Character and Paragraph Styles
  4. 5.4 Wrapping Text Around an Image
  5. 5.5 Working with Tables

Module 6

  1. 6.1 Saving, Preflight and Packaging Your Document
  2. 6.2 Exporting a PDF

Module 7

  1. 7.1 Principles of Design

Module 8

  1. 8.1 Letterheads
  2. 8.2 Business Card
  3. 8.3 Brochure
  4. 8.4 Multi-Page Binded Document
  5. 8.5 Print Booklet

Module 9

  1. 9.1 Creating a Template in InDesign
  2. 9.2 Using Step and Repeat
  3. 9.3 Grouping Objects
  4. 9.4 Island Spread & Page Tool-
  5. 9.5 Scripts
  6. 9.6 Object Styles
  7. 9.7 Content Collector & Content Placer
  8. 9.8 Gap Tool
  9. 9.9 Pathfinder Pallet

Module 10

  1. 10.1 Considerations When Working with Interactive Documents
  2. 10.2 Web Docs, Hyperlinks, Buttons and Rollovers
  3. 10.3 Creating Your Own Path
  4. 10.4 Exporting

Module 11

  1. 11.1 Outro

Adobe Indesign

InDesign is software for creating and editing page designing and layout arrangement tool used for arranging the contents in making posters, brochures, magazines, newspapers, books, presentations, and eBooks. It can also publish illustrations, graphs, tables, and other professional usages. High quality for both print and on-screen delivery was actually developed for the original magazine market; further, it has become the no1 application in the world for interactive developers, photographers, and designers to use anywhere to place content and images in any format.

It integrates with the rest of the Adobe tools such as Photoshop, Illustrator and flashes professional users from any profession can design, preview, review and produce content quickly and efficiently. InDesign also works with word processors such as MS Word, Adobe InCopy to import text. Any designer can make interactive designs by using animation pre-sets and media options in InDesign CS5.

Margins and Columns
Whenever a document is intended for print, there is some area where the printer will not print on the page. Simply put, this area on the document, the margin, is its edges. These can be changed and manipulated based on a printer’s specifications. Unlike Microsoft Word, however, these areas are not a restricted area. Text and graphics alike can hang into the margins, but an alert will pop up upon creating a PDF if there is content placed outside of the margins.

Columns are another guide that allow you to establish rhythm and line length effectively in a composition. In InDesign, every new text document that is dropped into the program from an outside source is initially one column wide. The space between columns is known as the gutter. the gutter is initially set to 1 pica or 12 points in width but can be changed as well.

Rulers, Manual Guides and Smart Guides
Just like in word processing applications, such as Microsoft Word, it is good to be able to find your location on the page in specific units. InDesign has Ruler Bars on both the top and left workspace frames to help navigate specific pages and analyze widths and heights. Manual guides have become relatively outdated with the addition of Smart guides but still hold validity in some cases.

Smart Guides are a recent addition to Adobe InDesign that speed up object alignment with the page and other objects. For a detailed introduction to Smart guides, watch the following video by Creative Prose.

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Frequently Asked Questions

Instructional methods, course requirements, and learning technologies can vary significantly from one online program to the next, but the vast bulk of them use a learning management system (LMS) to deliver lectures and materials, monitor student progress, assess comprehension, and accept student work. LMS providers design these platforms to accommodate a multitude of instructor needs and preferences.

Online education may seem relatively new, but years of research suggests it can be just as effective as traditional coursework, and often more so. According to a U.S. Department of Education analysis of more than 1,000 learning studies, online students tend to outperform classroom-based students across most disciplines and demographics. Another major review published the same year found that online students had the advantage 70 percent of the time, a gap authors projected would only widen as programs and technologies evolve.

All new learning innovations are met with some degree of scrutiny, but skepticism subsides as methods become more mainstream. Such is the case for online learning. Studies indicate employers who are familiar with online degrees tend to view them more favorably, and more employers are acquainted with them than ever before. The majority of colleges now offer online degrees, including most public, not-for-profit, and Ivy League universities. Online learning is also increasingly prevalent in the workplace as more companies invest in web-based employee training and development programs.

The concern that online students cheat more than traditional students is perhaps misplaced. When researchers at Marshall University conducted a study to measure the prevalence of cheating in online and classroom-based courses, they concluded, “Somewhat surprisingly, the results showed higher rates of academic dishonesty in live courses.” The authors suggest the social familiarity of students in a classroom setting may lessen their sense of moral obligation.

Choosing the right course takes time and careful research no matter how one intends to study. Learning styles, goals, and programs always vary, but students considering online courses must consider technical skills, ability to self-motivate, and other factors specific to the medium. Online course demos and trials can also be helpful.
Our platform is typically designed to be as user-friendly as possible: intuitive controls, clear instructions, and tutorials guide students through new tasks. However, students still need basic computer skills to access and navigate these programs. These skills include: using a keyboard and a mouse; running computer programs; using the Internet; sending and receiving email; using word processing programs; and using forums and other collaborative tools. Most online programs publish such requirements on their websites. If not, an admissions adviser can help.

Frequently Asked Questions

Instructional methods, course requirements, and learning technologies can vary significantly from one online program to the next, but the vast bulk of them use a learning management system (LMS) to deliver lectures and materials, monitor student progress, assess comprehension, and accept student work. LMS providers design these platforms to accommodate a multitude of instructor needs and preferences.

Online education may seem relatively new, but years of research suggests it can be just as effective as traditional coursework, and often more so. According to a U.S. Department of Education analysis of more than 1,000 learning studies, online students tend to outperform classroom-based students across most disciplines and demographics. Another major review published the same year found that online students had the advantage 70 percent of the time, a gap authors projected would only widen as programs and technologies evolve.

All new learning innovations are met with some degree of scrutiny, but skepticism subsides as methods become more mainstream. Such is the case for online learning. Studies indicate employers who are familiar with online degrees tend to view them more favorably, and more employers are acquainted with them than ever before. The majority of colleges now offer online degrees, including most public, not-for-profit, and Ivy League universities. Online learning is also increasingly prevalent in the workplace as more companies invest in web-based employee training and development programs.

The concern that online students cheat more than traditional students is perhaps misplaced. When researchers at Marshall University conducted a study to measure the prevalence of cheating in online and classroom-based courses, they concluded, “Somewhat surprisingly, the results showed higher rates of academic dishonesty in live courses.” The authors suggest the social familiarity of students in a classroom setting may lessen their sense of moral obligation.

Choosing the right course takes time and careful research no matter how one intends to study. Learning styles, goals, and programs always vary, but students considering online courses must consider technical skills, ability to self-motivate, and other factors specific to the medium. Online course demos and trials can also be helpful.
Our platform is typically designed to be as user-friendly as possible: intuitive controls, clear instructions, and tutorials guide students through new tasks. However, students still need basic computer skills to access and navigate these programs. These skills include: using a keyboard and a mouse; running computer programs; using the Internet; sending and receiving email; using word processing programs; and using forums and other collaborative tools. Most online programs publish such requirements on their websites. If not, an admissions adviser can help.

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Description

Adobe InDesign is a layout software that takes images and text and lays them out across pages. InDesign excels in handling multiple-page documents such as books, magazines, brochures, and portfolios. It can also create business cards, letterheads, posters, and flyers with ease.

Graphic designers and production artists are the primary users of this desktop publishing software. Behance integrates seamlessly with Photoshop and Illustrator, allowing you to easily showcase your work created in these popular design tools.

A top professional in the design industry, holding titles of 2D Animator and Adjunct Professor of Animation and Digital Art, will instruct you in the InDesign course.

First, you’ll learn to navigate the InDesign work area and create a new document while importing images. Then, you’ll explore “master pages,” a crucial tool for multi-page projects, followed by learning about other tools like table creation and packaging. This course will also go through more advanced techniques and design methods as well as types of exports.

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