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Adobe Illustrator

Course Highlights

Closed Caption

Certificate

Dedicated Tutors

6.44 Hours
32 Videos

Adobe Illustrator

Course Description

6.44 Hours

32 Videos

Adobe Illustrator is the leading graphic design tool.  The industry-standard vector graphics software is used by millions of designers and artists to create everything from gorgeous web and mobile graphics to logos, icons, book illustrations, product packaging, and billboards.  In addition, users can create freehand drawings, or trace and recolor graphics to turn them into works of art.

Since Illustrator is a vector-based design software, artwork can be scaled down for mobile screens and all the way up to billboard size, while always looking crisp and beautiful.

Illustrator launches saves, and renders effects extremely fast and allows users to reuse vector graphics and quickly access unlimited fonts. Illustrator works seamlessly with other Creative Cloud apps like Photoshop, InDesign, XD, and After Effects.

In this course you will learn the following:

  • How to Incorporate a Company Name into a Logo
  • Create a Flyer
  • Mock-Up a Website Design
  • Add Effects
  • Manage Styles
  • Edit Individual Characters to Create Typographic Designs

This course is designed for anyone with an interest in either graphic design or illustration.

Course Syllabus

Module 1: Tools and Effects in Illustrator

  1. 1.1 Course Introduction
  2. 1.2 Introduction to Adobe Illustrator
  3. 1.3 Basic Tools in Illustrator
  4. 1.4 Working with Shapes
  5. 1.5 Fills and Strokes
  6. 1.6 Pencil Tool
  7. 1.7 Pen Tool
  8. 1.8 Brush Tool
  9. 1.9 Compound Path
  10. 1.10 Gradients
  11. 1.11 Layers and Grooves
  12. 1.12 Transparency and Graphic Style
  13. 1.13 Transforming, Moving and Rotating Objects
  14. 1.14 Type Tool
  15. 1.15 Blending Shapes and Colors
  16. 1.16 Basic Effects in Illustrator
  17. 1.17 Image Trace Tool

Module 2: Creating Projects in Illustrator

  1. 2.1 Creating a Caricature Part 1
  2. 2.2 Creating a Caricature Part 2
  3. 2.3 Creating a Caricature Part 3
  4. 2.4 Creating a Caricature Part 4
  5. 2.5 Recreating a Wonka Bar Logo Part 1
  6. 2.6 Recreating a Wonka Bar Logo Part 2
  7. 2.7 Creating a Logo
  8. 2.8 Recreating a Pablo Picasso Painting Part 1
  9. 2.9 Recreating a Pablo Picasso Painting Part 2
  10. 2.10 Recreating a Pablo Picasso Painting Part 3
  11. 2.11 Recreating a Pablo Picasso Painting Part 4
  12. 2.12 Recreating a Pablo Picasso Painting Part 5
  13. 2.13 Recreating a Pablo Picasso Painting Part 6
  14. 2.14 Exporting
  15. 2.15 Conclusion

Adobe illustrator

Adobe Illustrator is used to create a variety of digital and printed images, including cartoons, charts, diagrams, graphs, logos, and illustrations. Illustrator allows a user to import a photograph and use it as a guide to trace an object in the photograph.

Adobe Illustrator is a software application for creating drawings, illustrations, and artwork using a Windows or MacOS computer. Illustrator was initially released in 1987 and it continues to be updated at regular intervals, and is now included as part of the Adobe Creative Cloud. Illustrator is widely used by graphic designers, web designers, visual artists, and professional illustrators throughout the world to create high quality artwork. Illustrator includes many sophisticated drawing tools that can reduce the time need to create illustrations.

Adobe Illustrator is used to create a variety of digital and printed images, including cartoons, charts, diagrams, graphs, logos, and illustrations. Illustrator allows a user to import a photograph and use it as a guide to trace an object in the photograph. This can be used to re-color or create a sketch-like appearance of a photograph.

Illustrator also makes it possible to manipulate text in many ways, making Illustrator a useful tool for creating postcards, posters, and other visual designs which use text and images together. Illustrator’s ability to place text around a curve is especially useful for artists creating logos. Illustrator is also used in designing mock-ups which show what the website will look like when it’s completed, and creating icons used within apps or websites.

One of Adobe Illustrator’s most important features is that the quality of artwork created using Illustrator is independent of the resolution at which it is displayed. This means that an image created in Illustrator can be enlarged or reduced without sacrificing image quality. This is an attribute of vector artwork, which uses mathematical relationships in describing lines, arcs, and other parts of an illustrator. By comparison, photographs edited using tools such as Adobe Photoshop are resolution-dependent, and image quality decreases when an image is enlarged.

A vector graphic is a set of polygons that make up the image, which are in turn composed of vectors. Each vector passes through a location known as a node or control point, which has a defined location on the x and y axes on a plane. The position of vectors can be related to each other by mathematical formulas, which precisely recalculate their position when an image is resized.

This property of vector graphics is different when compared to imaging software such as Photoshop, which uses pixel grids to render images. When this type of image is scaled up sufficiently, the individual pixels comprising a bit map become visible. This phenomenon results in a loss of image quality known as pixilation, which makes Illustrator especially advantageous for creating large images such as a billboard sign.

Illustrator’s ability to create and modify vector images means that must also save files in vector graphics formats. Some of these formats include Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG), Portable Document Format (PDF), Encapsulated PostScript (EPS), Windows Metafile (WMF) and Vector Markup Language (VML), which are detailed below:

PDF is a file format that Illustrator can export. It allows for images and text to display independently of hardware, software and OS. The PDF format includes a structured storage system that combines these elements and compresses them into a single file. It also includes a subset of PostScript to generate the graphics and a system for associating fonts with the documents.

An EPS file is essentially a PostScript program that contains a low-resolution preview of the image, which some applications are able to display. Earlier in its history, it was common to save Illustrator files into an EPS format for them to be shared with page layout applications.

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Frequently Asked Questions

Instructional methods, course requirements, and learning technologies can vary significantly from one online program to the next, but the vast bulk of them use a learning management system (LMS) to deliver lectures and materials, monitor student progress, assess comprehension, and accept student work. LMS providers design these platforms to accommodate a multitude of instructor needs and preferences.

Online education may seem relatively new, but years of research suggests it can be just as effective as traditional coursework, and often more so. According to a U.S. Department of Education analysis of more than 1,000 learning studies, online students tend to outperform classroom-based students across most disciplines and demographics. Another major review published the same year found that online students had the advantage 70 percent of the time, a gap authors projected would only widen as programs and technologies evolve.

All new learning innovations are met with some degree of scrutiny, but skepticism subsides as methods become more mainstream. Such is the case for online learning. Studies indicate employers who are familiar with online degrees tend to view them more favorably, and more employers are acquainted with them than ever before. The majority of colleges now offer online degrees, including most public, not-for-profit, and Ivy League universities. Online learning is also increasingly prevalent in the workplace as more companies invest in web-based employee training and development programs.

The concern that online students cheat more than traditional students is perhaps misplaced. When researchers at Marshall University conducted a study to measure the prevalence of cheating in online and classroom-based courses, they concluded, “Somewhat surprisingly, the results showed higher rates of academic dishonesty in live courses.” The authors suggest the social familiarity of students in a classroom setting may lessen their sense of moral obligation.

Choosing the right course takes time and careful research no matter how one intends to study. Learning styles, goals, and programs always vary, but students considering online courses must consider technical skills, ability to self-motivate, and other factors specific to the medium. Online course demos and trials can also be helpful.
Our platform is typically designed to be as user-friendly as possible: intuitive controls, clear instructions, and tutorials guide students through new tasks. However, students still need basic computer skills to access and navigate these programs. These skills include: using a keyboard and a mouse; running computer programs; using the Internet; sending and receiving email; using word processing programs; and using forums and other collaborative tools. Most online programs publish such requirements on their websites. If not, an admissions adviser can help.

Frequently Asked Questions

Instructional methods, course requirements, and learning technologies can vary significantly from one online program to the next, but the vast bulk of them use a learning management system (LMS) to deliver lectures and materials, monitor student progress, assess comprehension, and accept student work. LMS providers design these platforms to accommodate a multitude of instructor needs and preferences.

Online education may seem relatively new, but years of research suggests it can be just as effective as traditional coursework, and often more so. According to a U.S. Department of Education analysis of more than 1,000 learning studies, online students tend to outperform classroom-based students across most disciplines and demographics. Another major review published the same year found that online students had the advantage 70 percent of the time, a gap authors projected would only widen as programs and technologies evolve.

All new learning innovations are met with some degree of scrutiny, but skepticism subsides as methods become more mainstream. Such is the case for online learning. Studies indicate employers who are familiar with online degrees tend to view them more favorably, and more employers are acquainted with them than ever before. The majority of colleges now offer online degrees, including most public, not-for-profit, and Ivy League universities. Online learning is also increasingly prevalent in the workplace as more companies invest in web-based employee training and development programs.

The concern that online students cheat more than traditional students is perhaps misplaced. When researchers at Marshall University conducted a study to measure the prevalence of cheating in online and classroom-based courses, they concluded, “Somewhat surprisingly, the results showed higher rates of academic dishonesty in live courses.” The authors suggest the social familiarity of students in a classroom setting may lessen their sense of moral obligation.

Choosing the right course takes time and careful research no matter how one intends to study. Learning styles, goals, and programs always vary, but students considering online courses must consider technical skills, ability to self-motivate, and other factors specific to the medium. Online course demos and trials can also be helpful.
Our platform is typically designed to be as user-friendly as possible: intuitive controls, clear instructions, and tutorials guide students through new tasks. However, students still need basic computer skills to access and navigate these programs. These skills include: using a keyboard and a mouse; running computer programs; using the Internet; sending and receiving email; using word processing programs; and using forums and other collaborative tools. Most online programs publish such requirements on their websites. If not, an admissions adviser can help.

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Description

Adobe Illustrator is the leading graphic design tool.  The industry-standard vector graphics software is used by millions of designers and artists to create everything from gorgeous web and mobile graphics to logos, icons, book illustrations, product packaging, and billboards.  In addition, users can create freehand drawings, or trace and recolor graphics to turn them into works of art.

Since Illustrator is a vector-based design software, artwork can be scaled down for mobile screens and all the way up to billboard size, while always looking crisp and beautiful.

Illustrator launches saves, and renders effects extremely fast and allows users to reuse vector graphics and quickly access unlimited fonts. Illustrator works seamlessly with other Creative Cloud apps like Photoshop, InDesign, XD, and After Effects.

In this course you will learn the following:

  • How to Incorporate a Company Name into a Logo
  • Create a Flyer
  • Mock-Up a Website Design
  • Add Effects
  • Manage Styles
  • Edit Individual Characters to Create Typographic Designs

This course is designed for anyone with an interest in either graphic design or illustration.

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