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Adobe Flash / Animate

Course Highlights

Closed Caption

Certificate

Dedicated Tutors

15.45 Hours
57 Videos

Adobe Flash / Animate

Course Description

15.45 Hours

57 Videos

Adobe Flash/Animate stands as an industry-standard software for animation and interactive media, facilitating the creation of diverse projects ranging from short films and commercials to even larger undertakings like television shows. Although it offers comprehensive capabilities within the realm of animation, it falls short when it comes to functions like compositing, video editing, and sound editing. For optimal results in animated projects, it is advisable to complement Flash with complementary software such as Premiere and After Effects.

Flash excels in both frame-by-frame animation and more intricate puppet animation techniques. However, its camera functionality is somewhat limited. To convey a convincing 3D space, it is more prudent to integrate other software with more robust camera features and manipulation abilities, such as After Effects.

What truly sets Flash apart from other animation software is its innate interactivity features. With Flash, you have the power to craft interactive projects, websites (although it bears risks for SEO purposes), e-cards, and even video games.

Course Syllabus

Modules

  1. 1.1 Introduction
  2. 1.2 What is Flash Animate
  3. 1.3 Creating A New Document in Flash and Exploring the Interface
  4. 1.4 Drawing in Flash Part 1
  5. 1.5 Drawing in Flash Part 2
  6. 1.6 Frame by Frame Animating in Flash Part 1
  7. 1.7 Frame by Frame Animating in Flash Part 2
  8. 1.8 Saving, Rendering, and Exporting
  9. 1.9 Animating with Symbols Part 1
  10. 1.10 Animating with Symbols Part 2
  11. 1.11 Animating with Symbols Part 3
  12. 1.12 Different Types of Tweening Part 1
  13. 1.13 Different Types of Tweening Part 2
  14. 1.14 Nesting Symbols
  15. 1.15 Importing Graphics Part 1
  16. 1.16 Importing Graphics Part 2
  17. 1.17 Masking Part 1
  18. 1.18 Masking Part 2
  19. 1.19 Camera and Parallax Scrolling Part 1
  20. 1.20 Camera and Parallax Scrolling Part 2
  21. 1.21 Camera and Parallax Scrolling Part 3
  22. 1.22 Rotoscoping Part 1
  23. 1.23 Rotoscoping Part 2
  24. 1.24 Rotoscoping Part 3
  25. 1.25 Rotoscoping Part 4
  26. 1.26 Rotoscoping Part 5
  27. 1.27 Rotoscoping Part 6
  28. 1.28 Rotoscoping Part 7
  29. 1.29 Creating a Puppet Part 1
  30. 1.30 Creating a Puppet Part 2
  31. 1.31 Creating a Puppet Part 3
  32. 1.32 Creating a Puppet Part 4
  33. 1.33 Creating a Puppet Part 5
  34. 1.34 Creating a Puppet Part 6
  35. 1.35 Animating a Puppet Part 1
  36. 1.36 Animating a Puppet Part 2
  37. 1.37 Animating a Puppet Part 3
  38. 1.38 Animating a Puppet Part 4
  39. 1.39 Cycles
  40. 1.40 Interchangeable Parts
  41. 1.41 Interactivity
  42. 1.42 Text Part 1
  43. 1.43 Text Part 2
  44. 1.44 Animating with Code
  45. 1.45 Dialog Part 1
  46. 1.46 Dialog Part 2
  47. 1.47 Dialog Part 3
  48. 1.48 Dialog Part 4
  49. 1.49 Controlling the Timeline Part 1
  50. 1.50 Controlling the Timeline Part 1
  51. 1.51 Putting Together an Interactive eCard Part 1
  52. 1.52 Putting Together an Interactive eCard Part 2
  53. 1.53 Putting Together an Interactive eCard Part 3
  54. 1.54 Putting Together an Interactive eCard Part 4
  55. 1.55 Putting Together an Interactive eCard Part 5
  56. 1.56 Bone Tool
  57. 1.57 Conclusion

About Adobe Flash

The development of Adobe Flash software can be traced back to American software developer Jonathan Gay’s first experiments with writing programs on his Apple II computer in high school during the 1980s. Before long, Gay had written a graphics program for the Apple II using Pascal. Later, he teamed up with a local Macintosh users-group organizer, Charlie Jackson, who started a Macintosh software company called Silicon Beach Software. At Silicon Beach Software, Gay combined animation and digital sound to create the Macintosh electronic game Airborne!. Eventually, in his drive to create animation software compatible with Apple Inc.’s Macintosh and Microsoft Corporation’s Windows programs, he produced Smart Sketch, a program in which users could draw on the computer screen with an electronic pen. This was the start of his own software company, Future Wave Software, in the mid-1990s.

As the Internet grew in popularity, Future Wave added two-dimensional animation features to Smart Sketch that let Internet users display graphics and animation over the World Wide Web, and Future Splash Animator was born. The program’s first success came when Microsoft used the software for their MSN Web site. Macromedia, Inc., bought the rights to Future Splash Animator in 1996, creating Macromedia Flash, which became Adobe Flash after Adobe purchased Macromedia in 2005. Adobe Flash allows users to create animation for use on the Internet, and Adobe’s Flash Player is one of the most widely distributed applications on the Internet.

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As the Internet grew in popularity, Future Wave added two-dimensional animation features to Smart Sketch that let Internet users display graphics and animation over the World Wide Web, and Future Splash Animator was born. The program’s first success came when Microsoft used the software for their MSN Web site. Macromedia, Inc., bought the rights to Future Splash Animator in 1996, creating Macromedia Flash, which became Adobe Flash after Adobe purchased Macromedia in 2005. Adobe Flash allows users to create animation for use on the Internet, and Adobe’s Flash Player is one of the most widely distributed applications on the Internet.

Create characters that come alive.

Sketch and draw more expressive characters with Adobe Fresco live brushes that blend and bloom just like the real thing. Make your characters blink, talk and walk with simple frame-by-frame animation. And create interactive web banners that respond to user interactions such as mouse movement, touch and clicks.

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Frequently Asked Questions

Instructional methods, course requirements, and learning technologies can vary significantly from one online program to the next, but the vast bulk of them use a learning management system (LMS) to deliver lectures and materials, monitor student progress, assess comprehension, and accept student work. LMS providers design these platforms to accommodate a multitude of instructor needs and preferences.

Online education may seem relatively new, but years of research suggests it can be just as effective as traditional coursework, and often more so. According to a U.S. Department of Education analysis of more than 1,000 learning studies, online students tend to outperform classroom-based students across most disciplines and demographics. Another major review published the same year found that online students had the advantage 70 percent of the time, a gap authors projected would only widen as programs and technologies evolve.

All new learning innovations are met with some degree of scrutiny, but skepticism subsides as methods become more mainstream. Such is the case for online learning. Studies indicate employers who are familiar with online degrees tend to view them more favorably, and more employers are acquainted with them than ever before. The majority of colleges now offer online degrees, including most public, not-for-profit, and Ivy League universities. Online learning is also increasingly prevalent in the workplace as more companies invest in web-based employee training and development programs.

The concern that online students cheat more than traditional students is perhaps misplaced. When researchers at Marshall University conducted a study to measure the prevalence of cheating in online and classroom-based courses, they concluded, “Somewhat surprisingly, the results showed higher rates of academic dishonesty in live courses.” The authors suggest the social familiarity of students in a classroom setting may lessen their sense of moral obligation.

Choosing the right course takes time and careful research no matter how one intends to study. Learning styles, goals, and programs always vary, but students considering online courses must consider technical skills, ability to self-motivate, and other factors specific to the medium. Online course demos and trials can also be helpful.
Our platform is typically designed to be as user-friendly as possible: intuitive controls, clear instructions, and tutorials guide students through new tasks. However, students still need basic computer skills to access and navigate these programs. These skills include: using a keyboard and a mouse; running computer programs; using the Internet; sending and receiving email; using word processing programs; and using forums and other collaborative tools. Most online programs publish such requirements on their websites. If not, an admissions adviser can help.

Frequently Asked Questions

Instructional methods, course requirements, and learning technologies can vary significantly from one online program to the next, but the vast bulk of them use a learning management system (LMS) to deliver lectures and materials, monitor student progress, assess comprehension, and accept student work. LMS providers design these platforms to accommodate a multitude of instructor needs and preferences.

Online education may seem relatively new, but years of research suggests it can be just as effective as traditional coursework, and often more so. According to a U.S. Department of Education analysis of more than 1,000 learning studies, online students tend to outperform classroom-based students across most disciplines and demographics. Another major review published the same year found that online students had the advantage 70 percent of the time, a gap authors projected would only widen as programs and technologies evolve.

All new learning innovations are met with some degree of scrutiny, but skepticism subsides as methods become more mainstream. Such is the case for online learning. Studies indicate employers who are familiar with online degrees tend to view them more favorably, and more employers are acquainted with them than ever before. The majority of colleges now offer online degrees, including most public, not-for-profit, and Ivy League universities. Online learning is also increasingly prevalent in the workplace as more companies invest in web-based employee training and development programs.

The concern that online students cheat more than traditional students is perhaps misplaced. When researchers at Marshall University conducted a study to measure the prevalence of cheating in online and classroom-based courses, they concluded, “Somewhat surprisingly, the results showed higher rates of academic dishonesty in live courses.” The authors suggest the social familiarity of students in a classroom setting may lessen their sense of moral obligation.

Choosing the right course takes time and careful research no matter how one intends to study. Learning styles, goals, and programs always vary, but students considering online courses must consider technical skills, ability to self-motivate, and other factors specific to the medium. Online course demos and trials can also be helpful.
Our platform is typically designed to be as user-friendly as possible: intuitive controls, clear instructions, and tutorials guide students through new tasks. However, students still need basic computer skills to access and navigate these programs. These skills include: using a keyboard and a mouse; running computer programs; using the Internet; sending and receiving email; using word processing programs; and using forums and other collaborative tools. Most online programs publish such requirements on their websites. If not, an admissions adviser can help.

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Description

Adobe Flash/Animate stands as an industry-standard software for animation and interactive media, facilitating the creation of diverse projects ranging from short films and commercials to even larger undertakings like television shows. Although it offers comprehensive capabilities within the realm of animation, it falls short when it comes to functions like compositing, video editing, and sound editing. For optimal results in animated projects, it is advisable to complement Flash with complementary software such as Premiere and After Effects.

Flash excels in both frame-by-frame animation and more intricate puppet animation techniques. However, its camera functionality is somewhat limited. To convey a convincing 3D space, it is more prudent to integrate other software with more robust camera features and manipulation abilities, such as After Effects.

What truly sets Flash apart from other animation software is its innate interactivity features. With Flash, you have the power to craft interactive projects, websites (although it bears risks for SEO purposes), e-cards, and even video games.

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